Call 855-660-4261 with your lawn & garden questions every Saturday from 8:06am to 10:00am ET. Then listen to Mort answer your questions. Or email anytime at questions@themagicgarden.com
Listen to the weekly archive 24 hours a day 7 days a week on demand.
Keyword Search Results for:
Rose Bushes

5 Found

Question: 769-2512
My rose bushes have black spots all over them. Some cover half the leaf. What is it ? How can I control it? Bill, Norwich, CT

Mort's Answer:
Roses and fruit trees are Mother Nature's most attractive plants to insects and disease. Your plants have rust. Most rose fungi can be remedied by Captan, Benlate or Zaneb. Follow directions on the labels. Black Tar fungus starts out gray on the surface of the leaves and turns black. Eventually it will eat through to the under-leaves after it has bubbled up on the top. The affected leaves have to be carted off to the dump. This winter has allowed many fungi to survive. You do not need to deal with this again next year.

back to top




Question: 781-2712
Our rose bushes to not do well the second year. We buy them in pots and put them into the ground. What makes them bloom so little? dennis, Norwich, CT

Mort's Answer:
Roses need well-aerated and elevated beds to do well. Do not use chemical fertilizer on roses. They much prefer well rotted-fertilizer like horse or cow that is composted or aged. Because the water table is so shallow in your area and there is so much ledge under the top soil, you also need to add a third sand to the third manure and native soil. This mix will allow the other nutrients that are in your soil to become active. You could add bonemeal the first year to jump start the phosphorus.

back to top




Question: 968-2713
My rose bushes have yellowish leaves. On my Hybrid Teas all the leaves have fallen and left the flowers buds. I mulch them and fertilize regularly. How can I correct this? Ruth, Lisbon, CT

Mort's Answer:
Pull the mulch off the bed. Roses love aeration and plenty of room. Put the mulch in a compost pile to over winter before using it on other plants. Cultivate your roses with a dust mulch. The top layer will insulate the lower soil and retain the moisture in the ground. Buy a good fungicide now and spray the stems and leaves that remain. Add a teaspoon of liquid soap to the spray. If you can purchase a wettable Bordeaux Mix, dust the soil before making your dosage for the stems and leaves.

back to top




Question: 988-3113
My heritage rose bush which is also very old has not bloomed for the last few years. This year I added banana peals and egg shells to the soil and they look terrific. Can I continue to do this? Pete, East Lyme. CT

Mort's Answer:
I am sure your plants want a repeat because they have a lot of appeal. It would be easier to add bonemeal and manure to the soil. Most soils have the phosphorus locked. Bonemeal, egg shells and bananas have the plenty of phosphorus. New bush roses can tolerate synthetic fertilizer but the hybrids do very well with organic amendments that chelate the phosphorus.

back to top




Question: 1189-1414
My climbing rose bush is against the house facing south. Despite this, it is quite shady. It has canes that have turned black near the middle. There is little other signs of stress. Any ideas? Jean, Wilimantic, CT

Mort's Answer:
It could be a bacteria or a fungus. You should cut back your climber this fall anyway. Be sure to sterilize your loppers or pruners before making cuts. Bacteria often will revisit a plant from these tools. I highly recommend that you transplant your bush after pruning. Rose bushes and climbers need good air circulation and plenty of sun light. They also need aged manure every year. You will also need a trellis to hold the new branches on your bush. Rose combination sprays are available with fungicides. I use a micronized sulphur spray on my hybrid tees. This takes care of the fungi and many insects. You could also use Bordeaux mix as an insecticide-fungicide.

back to top