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Keyword Search Results for:
Rose

11 Found

Question: 141-5201
I fertilized with a soluble fertilizer three weeks ago. Since that time buds have appeared but have not opened. Could this be the problem? Julie, Waterford, CT

Mort's Answer:
If you do not see any sign of insect or rust, you are correct in your concern. Rose growers do not like to use inorganic fertilizers. If they must enrich the soil, they will use a granular fertilizer. Your soil is probably rich enough in nitrogen. There is plenty of phosphorus in New England soils although it may not be readily available in some soils. There is no need to fertilize, if you were getting hundreds of blooms. Excess fertilizer has created an unbalanced nutrient content in the roses. I would add some hydrated lime to the soil under the roses to release the nitrogen, which is overloaded.

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Question: 340-5201
My rose buds wither on the bush before blooming. They are healthy otherwise. What can I do? Jean, West Lebanon, NH

Mort's Answer:
Excess nitrogen from manures and fertilizer will produce great leafs but leave a lot to be desired in the bloom and stem development. You need a higher proportion of phosphorus, calcium and magnesium to have great roses. Give each plant a half cup of epsom salts, a half cup of bonemeal and a tablespoon of Borax. These elements should be a solution to your budding problem.

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Question: 341-5201
My roses are still in bloom! Flo, Middletown, RI

Mort's Answer:
Aquidneck Island is protected from the cold air by nearby land masses and warmed by the ocean currents. Viva la rosa in November. My miniature roses are turning yellow. We have them outdoors on the patio. Excessive water from rain will rot the roots. I would repot the roses in a 50/50 mix of coarse sand and potting soil. Be careful not to break the root. If you see roots that are black or brown, shave them with a sharp knife.

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Question: 342-5201
My potted miniature rose has yellow leaves. I watered regularly this winter. What is wrong? Betty, West Point, NY

Mort's Answer:
Your plant could have root rot from excessive watering. Remove the pot from the soil and check for brown mushy roots. Cut them out and repot in a clay pot with a soil mix of 1/3 coarse sand. Your rose needs a rest every winter. Water only when soil is dry.

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Question: 343-5201
My 6 foot tall Rose bush has had hundreds of blooms in past years. I fertilized with a soluble fertilizer three weeks ago. Since that time buds have appeared but have not opened. Could this be the problem? Julie, Waterford, CT

Mort's Answer:
If you do not see any sign of insect or rust, you are correct in your concern. Rose growers do not like to use inorganic fertilizers. If they must enrich the soil, they will use a granular fertilizer. Your soil is probably rich enough in nitrogen. There is plenty of phosphorus in New England soils although it may not be readily available in some soils. There is no need to fertilize, if you were getting hundreds of blooms. Excess fertilizer has created an unbalanced nutrient content in the roses. I would add some hydrated lime to the soil under the roses to release the nitrogen, which is overloaded.

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Question: 344-5201
I have large hybrid roses that are very healthy looking but do not produce the large yellow flowers. We use a popular liquid fertilizer regularly. What can we do? Ed, New London, CT

Mort's Answer:
Roses do not appreciate artificial fertilizer. The yellow rose of Texas prefers a warm breezy bed with good additions of manure and/ or other organic material in the soil. Green manures of grass clippings, shredded leaves can be added each spring and fall. Roses should be spaced 4 or 5 feet apart with plenty of air circulation. They do very well in elevated beds. Heavy pruning in the fall will minimize winter damage. Cut the bushes back to 3 main stems that are 3 feet high. Plants over 5 years can be cut back to 5 main branches each fall. If you can protect the bushes with burlap teepees each winter, you can do the pruning in the spring. Some dieback may occur in the spring. Cut off the blackened ends, if his occurs in the spring.

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Question: 346-5201
My roses are yellowing. I have watered them sufficiently during the dry season. What could be the problem? If you don't see any sign of insects. Arlene, N.Attleboro, MA

Mort's Answer:
It could be a number of things. Yellow can be too little or too much water or a lack of usable iron. I would suggest using epsom salts to free up the iron in the soil. If that doesn't work, then you can get a fertilizer with chelated iron. Roses do well in dry weather. It just might be too much water. I would also work on conditioning the soil with aged manure and bonemeal. Roses love to be cultivated. They enjoy an organically rich soil. Another possibility is grubs or nematodes munching on the roots. This fall dig around the roots. If you see insects, add dursban or some other grubicide to the soil.

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Question: 347-5201
How far back can I cut climbing roses? Robert, Newport, RI

Mort's Answer:
I cut back climbers to five or six feet each late fall or early winter. My roses are still green this time of the year in zone 6.

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Question: 937-2013
There years ago I planted a pink hybrid rose. It produced nothing but lush foliage. I fertilized with rose food. What happened? Dottie, Norwich, CT

Mort's Answer:
Your Hybrid Tea rose needs a sense of humus. Shrub roses can do well with chemical fertilizer but the hybrids need an organic base. Aged manure old compost, grass clippings and shredded leaves will enhance the soil and free up natural elements in your soil. Unlike shrub roses that make great hedges, Teas like to stand alone for good aeration around the plant. You will often see them in raised beds in botanical gardens. Direct sunlight and annual supplements of good manure will reward your efforts.

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Question: 232-5201
How can I start Rose of Sharon cuttings.? Marilyn, Watertown, NY

Mort's Answer:
In the late spring, you can take 8 inch terminal shoots. Cut the bottom at an acute angle with a sharp knife. Wrap the cuttings in a wet cheesecloth and let them stay in the sun until the cloth has dried. Build a 3 sided box against the foundation that is 6 inches deep. Dip the cuttings in root hormone and insert two inches of the cuttings into coarse sand. In the fall, your rooted cuttings should be ready for transplant.

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Question: 233-5201
I have dried some 25 roses for a wedding. This is the first year that I have experienced mold. There is a worm in one of the flowers. What can I do? Darlene, Mystic, CT

Mort's Answer:
You need to extract the worm with some tweezers. If the discoloration is too great, you can dye the flower buds with red ink. Florist use a gel to dry flowers. This is better than air drying because it prevents air borne spores from reaching the buds. You may want to start over with the gel. New England has been very damp this summer and I would not shoulder the blame for what mother nature has wrought.

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