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Keyword Search Results for:
Mulch

5 Found

Question: 397-3410
My friends and I have been involved in a native plant restoration project, and we made some calculations as to prices per square yard if we use 3" mulch, varying depths of compost, and varying fertilizers. Our price estimates ranged from about $28.00 to $12.50. It seems very expensive. Do these estimates sound about right, or have we done our calculations wrong? Genette

Mort's Answer:
Mulches are sold by the cubic yard, which equals 54 sq.ft at 6 inches deep or 108 sq.ft at 3 inches deep. Figure out your square foot cost from that spread. Mulches are sold at varying prices per yard. Volume discounts are available. Proximity to the source for both the customer and the manufacturer are key elements in costing the material. Dumping accessibility is also a determining factor.

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Question: 589-3111
I recently bought some new wood mulch from a tree company. Can I use it now as mulch? Stasie, Kewanee, IL ; I have a new Juniper that I plant recently. It is turning yellow. The root ball is a tangle around some white granular mass. What is happening? Mary, Norwich, CT

Mort's Answer:
Both of these questions are relevant to a growing concern, Many companies cannot find adequate soil for their plants and are using wood shavings and bark instead. This creates a problem that shows up as yellowing of the plants. This company has compensated by using a fertilizer to green up the Juniper. Wood will draw nitrogen from the soil and release it into the air. Rotted wood that is a year or two old will do the opposite and draw nitrogen from the air into the soil. Eventually, both situations will be mollified with aging.

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Question: 927-1713
When is a good time to add new mulch? Do I need to remove the green substance on my field stone walks? Can I leave the moss that grows near the stones? Julie, Templeton, MA

Mort's Answer:
Some folks prefer to wait until some weeds sprout. This allows them to accept volunteers from nearby property. I once had a bird donation of a white dogwood. If you do not like surprises, add a couple of inches of mulch now. Algae grow on rocks especially in the shade. It is not harmful. It adds nitrogen to the soil. This may help to explain the growth of moss. If you do not want remoss, add sour milk or lime. It will eventually return again, if you do not apply every year.

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Question: 933-1913
I have an area 30x 90 feet of mulch. It covers a number of perennials including veronica, day lilies and salvia. Should I remove the two inches or add to it? Reed, St.Paul, MN

Mort's Answer:
It is a good idea to add to the mulch each year. The bottom will rot and become part of the soil. Aged mulch adds nitrogen to the soil. New mulch may borrow nitrogen from the surrounding soil. This is the reason that a lot of new plantings with new wood mulch are often not as vibrant as those planted in loam.

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Question: 1306-2516
You recommended that I remove the red dyed mulch last year. I replaced it with a natural cedar mulch. My day lilies are doing spectacular this year. Thank you, Pat, Stonington, CT

Mort's Answer:
Yellowing is a sign of too much iron or too little. It also relevant to water in the same way. Red dyed mulch does have a lot of iron. Cedar or pine chips without dye are neutral. Cedar chips have a natural insect repellant. Any mulch will absorb water and hold it longer for the plants. Usually, when plants are first planted with wood mulch, there can be a slight yellowing of those plants due to excess water content. Fertilizer can help bring back the color.

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