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Keyword Search Results for:
Fruit trees

4 Found

Question: 736-1712
Some of the fruit trees that I bought have broken branches. They are bare root and about six feet tall. Do I need to fertilize them as well? Katie, Marquette, MI

Mort's Answer:
Cut back the entire plant about six inches. Cut the broken branches clean down to the next branch. You need not put fertilizer in the hole. You can give each a handful of a higher middle number fertilizer on top of he loam after planting. Do not plan on having fruit the first year. You should establish a good root system by planting in good soil. Allow a dip in the soil from the edge of he hole to collect rain water. Water thoroughly the first day. If it does not rain in a week, repeat the soaking a second time.

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Question: 1062-5113
I have dwarf fruit trees that are about seven ft tall, the trunks are about four and one-half inches diameter at most near the ground. Apples, nectarine, apricot, pear, plum (only the apples bear fruit or edible fruit). How can I fertilize them to help? Linda, South coast of RI

Mort's Answer:
Flowers are sometimes frozen in the early spring by wind chill. If flowers are forming, pollination can be hampered by too much early heat. It is always a good idea to fertilize every five years with a high phosphorus granular fertilizer. At the end of the leaves you can make a circle of 14 holes. Use a crowbar to go done at least two feet. Fill the holes with 5-10-10. You will also need a spray program that includes a dormant oil spray. I recommend a Home Orchard spray in addition to the early oil spray. Follow directions on the labels.

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Question: 1226-415
I have a knoll in my front yard. I recently had a contractor dig a dozen holes that go down here to four feet to use for planting planting an orchard. What fruit tree would you recommend? Joe, Mansfield, CT

Mort's Answer:
Dwarf apples, cherries and pears will do nicely for beginners in New England. Do not expect fruit for two or there years. I would buy trees with an inch caliper at least. They already have the scaffolding for flower bearing branches. Plant them 25 feet apart. Your holes should have some gravel about a foot under the root ball. You will need a spray program to succeed in this endeavor. Stake the trees after planting this spring,

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Question: 1440-2917
I planted my fruit trees as per your instruction and got good fruiting the past two years. What kind of mulch would you suggest, if any. Joe, Mansfield, CT

Mort's Answer:
Cedar chip is the best for warding off insects. You can also plant clover in the lawn area nearby. This will encourage bees to visit and pollinate your trees.I am happy that you had fruition for your effort.

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