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Keyword Search Results for:
Azaleas

6 Found

Question: 916-1513
My evergreen azaleas are just sticks right now. The branches bend but do not break. Can I move them now? Can I move my Camellia now? Diane, Camden, AR

Mort's Answer:
Since you are in zone 7, your azalea plants should be sprouting out now. Evergreen azaleas can be transplanted at any time. Deciduous species have to be dug prior to the leaves appearing. Now is the best time for either. You probably have winter burn on your plants. You should plant them in a shady area that has shelter from the north. Camellia are best transplanted in cooler temps. I would wait until fall to move them rather than now. They would require much more care now, if moved.

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Question: 936-1913
I am thinking of buying an Azalea for Mother's Day. Any suggestions? Bill, Fitchburg, MA

Mort's Answer:
If you buy from a florist, they were likely grown in a greenhouse for the holiday. Most of the forced azalea are not hardy in zone 6. Many azalea are going to in bloom naturally on May 12th. There is a rose red called Mother's Day that will be on time. I love the Rosebud, which is a double pink flowered azalea. There are many other hardy ones including the Japanese Azaleas. I like A. yedoensis poukhanensis, which is light purple. Any of the nursery grown can be planted outdoors. They usually are sold in plastic cans and can be wrapped in foil for a gift.

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Question: 1044-4513
My azalea did not bloom this past spring. What could cause this problem? Barbara, Wheeling, WV

Mort's Answer:
A late frost will nip many flowers in the bud. Early blooming azalea need protection from the north wind. Often times the wind will dry the buds. The best location for these early bloomers is on the east or west side of a structure with an evergreen plant or fence as a buffer from the north side. If the azalea is on the south side, the heat of the sun may cause the buds to swell prematurely. When the late frosts hit, the tissue is destroyed. Deciduous azaleas with heavy bud shells and PJM can often survive in unprotected areas but they should be planted in the partial shade with shelter.

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Question: 1176-4114
I want to cut back my azaleas now? Will I harm them? George, Boaz, AL

Mort's Answer:
You will do no harm but I would suggest that you wait until summer next year. Buds are now forming on azalea and rhododendron for spring blooming. There is a nursery that has developed an Encore azalea that repeats its bloom in late summer. It expects to have an everblooming one soon. That type of plant could be cut like the Knock Out roses that recover very quickly to bloom again.

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Question: 1233-815
How can I start some azaleas from cuttings? I heard that it is best after they bloom. George, Boaz, AL

Mort's Answer:
You will get the benefit of the blooms by waiting. If you have a lot of plants, you can select terminal shoots form different azaleas now and try this indoors. Take eight inch cuttings and remove the buds. Cut an acute angle at the bottom. This will expose as much cambium as possible for a good start. Let the cuttings sit a few days. This will allow some callousing. You will need a bed of at least six inches deep of coarse sand. A wooden box is best. Wet the sand once and mist every day thereafter. Cuttings should be inserted two inches into the sand. Chose a sunny location that gets good heat. If you chose to do it outdoors, put the box near a spigot.

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Question: 1300-3815
I have some 15 year old yellow and orange azaleas that are about eight feet tall. They are looking spindly. Can I cut them back now? Ed, Bosrah, CT

Mort's Answer:
Schlippenbachi azaleas can grow to 12 feet. They have a smaller flower than the very similar A. mollis, which gets to only four feet with larger blooms. Both are producing buds now for the spring. I would wait until after they have finished blooming in early summer. You can cut off a foot at a time from the top in June, July and August.

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