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Category Search Results for:
Fruits and Vegetables

300 Total Found

Question: 1394-4516
I have got three seeds from my seedless watermelon. I was thinking of planting them next spring. Will they bear fruit? Todd, Willimantic, CT

Mort's Answer:
Those seeds are supposed to be sterile as the original seeds. I would venture a shot at an improbable result of fruition for your efforts. If you manage to get fruit, I would continue to regenerate new plants. They might have incredible hardiness or some other compensatory characteristic.

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Question: 592-3211
Earlier this year, while tilling in some of last years leaves into my garden, I included some grass clippings from my newly cut lawn. After I did this, I realized that I had used a crabgrass preventer/fertilizer on the lawn. How long should I wait to make sure that the effects of the lawn application don't show up in the vegetable that I'd like to plant there? Wayne, Oakridge, NC

Mort's Answer:
Clean compost is excellent for gardens. Weed killers are growth retarders in the soil. It should not take longer than one year to dissipate the growth inhibitors.

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Question: 573-2711
My zucchini has been doing well. It has a lot of flowers but they are wilting. I did fertilize them. This is their first year. What is wrong? Paula, Kansas City, MO

Mort's Answer:
Melons, pumpkins and squash are all susceptible to squash bug. When the plant is about six or eight inches, the adult lays an egg inside the stem. As the plant grows,the egg turns into a larvae and eats the inside of the stem. Just as the zucchini is about to bear fruit, there is not enough energy left for the roots to supply the vegetable. You could try to rescue the plant but do not be disappointed. Use a sharp razor knife to cut the stem at about five or six inches perpendicular to the ground. Because the stem is translucent, you will be able to spot a brown or black bug inside. Carefully remove the bug with tweezers. Wrap scotch tape around the cut. Next year plant the seeds in a styrofoam cup that is two thirds full of good soil. Cut off the bottom after the seedlings are ready for outdoors. The cup should be about three inches above the soil line.

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