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Category Search Results for:
Lawn Care

72 Total Found

Question: 562-2511
We have dandelions on over an acre of lawn. How best do we get rid of them? Jean, Stonington, CT

Mort's Answer:
It's not a good idea to use target sprays on such a large area. Target sprays like Round-Up, Clean-Up and Finale will kill everything that it touches. You might consider letting them grow. If you can mow frequently, you keep them from seeding themselves. My Uncle Herb would be glad to come over and pick the dandelions for his salad and wine. There are broadleaf herbicides that are very effective that come in combination with fertilizers. Team and Gallery can be purchased as separate herbicides. Follow directions on the package.

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Question: 1024-4013
We just had our St.Augustine lawn dug up because our lawn company advised that we had a fungus. They removed the top inch of soil and replaced it with an inch of very sandy loam and Bermuda seed. They have come back a couple of times to rectify some large areas that did not grow well. We now have a Bermuda grass lawn with some bad areas that are six feet long. What else can we do? Ed, Austin, TX

Mort's Answer:
Starting lawns from seed is not as effective as using sod. You will have to continue to top dress for at least another year. You can use winter rye in late November to fill in the bare spots. Continue with the fungicide treatment that they are using as well.

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Question: 530-1711
Can I start Grass seed now? What is the best way to apply? Zane, Norwich, CT

Mort's Answer:
New lawns require a time interval between fertilizer and lime with separate raking. This will not release as much nitrogen into the air. I like to apply the lime as soon as the soil is turned over and raked out. Fertilizer and good seed can be applied a few days later. Good seed includes a mix of fescue, annual rye and perennial rye in your area. Some packaged seeds are 99% annual rye, which is only good for patching and light reseeding. Use an iron rake with 12-16 tines for raking in lime and fertilizer. Seed is applied last and is slightly turned into the soil with a long wooden rake. New lawns should be rolled with a half filled roller. Lightly water after rolling and again in five days, if it does not rain.

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Question: 582-2316
We have a cement block wall that was covered with moss. After putting bleach on the wall, it is cleared but the grass near the wall has died. Behind the wall is a flowering cherry. Is it in danger? What can I do about the grass? Laura, Lewisburg, WV

Mort's Answer:
Bleach has destroyed the bacteria in the soil near the wall. Scratch the surface of the affected area and allow the aeration to bring back other bacteria from surrounding soil. You could add some manure and grass seed after a couple of weeks. I do think that your Cherry is vulnerable considering that it was not on the face of the wall.

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Question: 636-4311
We had a terrible time growing grass here in Austin, TX this year because of the drought and water restrictions. My St. Augustine grass turned gray and just got worst as the year went on. I used fertilizer and chinch bug control to no avail. Can I save it? Ed, Austin,Tx

Mort's Answer:
You need to apply a fungicide like Benlate now and in the spring. You also need to aerate your soil with a heavy duty aerator. Rake out the plugs and save them in a compost pile through the winter. Top dress the aerated soil with new loam and with a mix of 50% St.Augustine and winter rye. Stenotaphrum secumdatum has excellent lateral growth and will quickly fill in the winter rye in the spring. You can use gypsum as an amendment and additional fungicide this fall.

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Question: 676-2216
We put in some Bermuda grass this spring twice and it did not grow. I tilled the top two inches and hauled in three inches of sandy loam. What can we do? Ed, Austin, TX

Mort's Answer:
Because your soil is so hard, you did the right thing in bringing in the additional soil. You should have at least eight inches on top. You can supplement the five inches with about four inches of aged manure. This will add water holding capacity to the soil as well as nutrients. Your seeds probably dried out in the heat. New grass seed has to be constantly moist to germinate. I would suggest that you sow annual rye seed, whether or not you bring in the manure. Rye seed will germinate quickly and give way after the Bermuda germinates. Soon there will be drought tolerant blue grasses available for your area. St.Augustine and Buffalo grass are also quite tolerant.

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Question: 724-1312
The past week or so have had the beautiful weather with warm temperatures. This has made our grass grow quite long and thick. My question is, could we cut the grass at this point? We know it is early and have not put down the first application of fertilizer, but if we wait, the grass will be much longer. Would a light cut hurt the grass at this time? Anna, Amherst, NY

Mort's Answer:
Temperatures are returning to normal and the grass will be retarded. There is no need for the grass to be cut back until heat resumes. Most grasses can be left to grow tall in the fall to protect the roots. We now recommend to let lawns grow to three inches before cutting. This allows for shaded crowns and a lot less water. When normal weather resumes, you can start your fertilizer program.

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Question: 909-1213
Can I use grass clippings in my compost pile? Julie, Templeton, MA

Mort's Answer:
If you put herbicide on your lawn, the compost will not be as fertile as without it. I have seen instances, where lawn clippings produced sickly plants but have not killed the plants. Grass clippings, leaves and table scraps but no meat will enrich the composition. A good pile is three sided and you toss the bottom material to the top frequently.

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Question: 65-5201
Can we use Milky Spore and Dursban for grub control.? Frank, West Greenwich,RI

Mort's Answer:
It takes two to three years to colonize with the Milky Spore bacteria. In the meantime you can use the Dursban, when the soil temperature is 65 in spring and fall. In the summer, you can use sex lure traps to catch the adult beetles.

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Question: 68-5201
Grubs have completely wiped out my lawn. Can I turn it over and start again? Bob, Coventry, RI

Mort's Answer:
It may prove fruitless unless you have 6 to 8 inches of loam. With a sandy subsoil in your area, fertilizers and other compounds will leach out quickly. Your loam should be rich with organic material. Manure, peat and shredded pine needles will help build the water retention ability and nutrient needed for a good lawn. You may decide to build a Japanese or rock garden instead. Whatever you do decide, you will still have to treat the area for grubs. Before you bring in loam for the lawn, you can harrow and till the present remnants of the lawn. This will help build body for the new lawn or garden.

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Question: 390-3410
Grubs have completely wiped out my lawn. Can I turn it over and start again? Bob, Coventry, RI

Mort's Answer:
It may prove fruitless unless you have 6 to 8 inches of loam. With a sandy subsoil in your area, fertilizers and other compounds will leach out quickly. Your loam should be rich with organic material. Manure, peat and shredded pine needles will help build the water retention ability and nutrient needed for a good lawn. You may decide to build a Japanese or rock garden instead. Whatever you do decide, you will still have to treat the area for grubs. Before you bring in loam for the lawn, you can harrow and till the present remnants of the lawn. This will help build body for the new lawn or garden.

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